greatnorthwoods.org - Language and Glossary

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Many of the passages between the mountains in northern New England are called "notches". As settlers cleared the woods they built log cabins. The logs were notched using an axe at either end to interlock with each other. Since the gaps between the mountains looked somewhat like a notch, this was what they were named.

Coos: The name of the largest and northernmost county in New Hampshire comes from the Abenaki word, "coo-ash" meaning "pines". Living in the area was a tribe known as the "Coo-ash-aukes" meaning "dwellers in the place of the pines".

As with most areas of the country and the world, we in Coos County have our own dialect. If you don't want to be instantly recognized as an outsider, the most important word to learn to pronounce is Coos. It is not pronounced "Cooze", as in Coos Bay, Oregon. It's "Co-awes" as in Co-oss" County, New Hampshire.

The next word is yes. Up here, it's ayuh. In Vermont it's the same, with slightly different inflection.

In Vermont the word "idea" is often pronounced "idear".


This came from an e-mail "joke"... A lot of it is true though.

You know you're from northern Maine, New Hampshire or Vermont if...

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If you arrived here stuck in someone else's frames...use this link to break free!

E-Mail: edsanders@edsanders.com

Copyright 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 by Ed Sanders.